Fastest growing Recruitment Membership Body Join Britain's Institute of Recruiters (IOR)

Millennials are twice as likely as anyone else to lie about being fired

Linkedin has released a report looking at the workplace attitudes of the millennials, with 70% saying they'd hide the fact they’ve been fired.

Linkedin has released a report looking at the workplace attitudes of the millennials, with one finding standing out – 70 per cent of those surveyed said they’d go out of their way to hide the fact they’ve been fired.

The “New Norms @Work” survey collected data from 1,000 US-based full-time employees people aged between 25 to 34 were much less likely to admit to been fired from a previous job than older workers.

56 per cent of all workers said in the report that if they’d been fired, they would “work to hide this information” from prospective new employers, compared to a full 70 per cent of millennials trying to be more secretive about their past.

They are also more likely to try to reframe their untimely departures, with 31 per cent of workers aged 25 to 34 saying that they’d “make it look like they have left on their own accord,” compared to 16 per cent of those aged 35 and over.

Attention Recruiters
See Live Jobs on SplitFee.org – Don’t Miss Out
It’s FREE if you Join Now!

LinkedIn’s career expert Catherine Fisher believes that millennials trying to rewrite history for image reasons. “Millennials are very focused on managing their professional brand,” she told Business Insider. Being fired is taboo — and off-brand.

Dan Schawbel, a workplace expert who’s written on changing attitudes around employment, suggests that technology is behind the shift.

“You don’t see them posting negative status updates on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram,” he argues. While everyone shapes their work histories, millennials, he says, “take this to the next level by guarding their professional and personal image online, covering up anything bad that’s ever happened to them.”

The-Complete-Recruiter course

Linkedin has released a report looking at the workplace attitudes of the millennials, with one finding standing out – 70 per cent of those surveyed said they’d go out of their way to hide the fact they’ve been fired. The “New Norms @Work” survey collected data from 1,000 US-based full-time employees people aged between 25 to 34 were much less likely to admit to been fired from a previous job than older workers. 56 per cent of all workers said in the report that if they’d been fired, they would “work to hide this information” from prospective new employers, compared…

Review Overview

User Rating: Be the first one !
0
Join the IOR to be part of creating excellence in recruiting standards & service